Posts Tagged ‘OEM’

So the final part of my spring preparation was sprocket and chain swap. From what I have gathered form different forums and people that have been riding the 640’s for year is that the best option for the front sprocket is that OEM KTM ones, and they are also quite cheap. For the rear I have went with JT Sprockets and the OEM KTM didn’t have the one with tooth count that I needed, and the chain I chose was a DID 520VX2, its a 520 spec chain with x-rings.
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So it was time to jack-up the bike and start tearing it apart, yet again.
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With the new sprockets, I have also decided to also change the gearing. I went form 16/42 stock ratio, to a 15/44, recommended by a good friend. After a few rides, I really like this setup and with a throttle cam system, the bike has really, turned in to a crawler at really low revs.
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After removing the old rear sprocket, I have thoroughly cleaned the bolts so that loctite would hold when I put everything back together.
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Shiny new rear sprocket on the hub.
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Before I had reasembeled the rear end, I have takent the adjuster bolts out and dipped them into anti-seize high temp paste so that they wont seize up again.
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Next I installed the front sprocket up, just so that I could measure the chain length needed. I got a 120 link chain so I knew I had to take some links off.
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Shortened up and put together with quick link
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After that it was all just the matter of torquing up the front sprocket and cleaning everything before use.
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All you need to do after a this is go on a short ride to check everything and after that re-adjust the chain tension. This should hopefully last at least 2 seasons of riding.

Stay safe!

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The stock tank on a 640 Enduro only holds 12l, that is enough for around 180km (depending on how you ride). The size of the tank is great if you are riding around in bush or local fire roads and trail, but if you want to do some more adventure riding you need a bit more of a range. For this matter I have decided to get a 18l KTM OEM tank for the 640 Enduro/SM. Those tanks are really rare here in Europe, so I looked over to the great USA for it. They have a lot of good stuff over there for the 640’s., including the tank I need. The prices for those tanks are really cheap, when you convert them to €, but unfortunately shipping and import charges are usually a deal killers.

Scouring the European e-bay system I have found a good tank, and lost the bidding war. By this time I have already been mentally preparing myself to cash out for a brand new tank form KTM. After patiently looking around e-bay for over a month, my luck has changed. There was a tank posted with “Buy-it-now” option. I have quickly contacted the seller about the shipping price and negotiated a bit lower price on the tank. After just 4 days, the DHL showed up with a huge box for me.
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Inside was a well protected tank.
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It has a grey decal already on so it fits my bike perfectly. Also it came with a fuel tap and a few scratches.
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First thing I did was weight the tank, as it felt really heavy when I took it out of the box. It weighs 5,8kg which is just under 13 pounds. Next on the list was filling the tank with water and check for any leaks. Luckily no leaks, after a quick flush I drained the water.
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Now it was time to see if it fits on the bike as the OEM part number said it only fits 2000-2002 KTM 640’s. So I began stripping the bike down.
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Before taking the tank off the bike, I have drained it off fuel. I didn’t want to handle the tank with gas in it like I did on KLE usually.
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To remove the tank you also have to remove the the side covers. Underbelly wasn’t cleaned for a while I guess.
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Naked bike.
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Before putting the big tank on the bike, I took some measurements of both tanks to see how much wider is the 18L one.
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Stock 12L tank with shrouds it’s 43cm or 17 inches wide and the 18L one is 49cm or just over 19 inches wide. That is 3cm or 1,18 inches wider per side. So overall the bike is still very slim, though it looks a lot beefier with this tank on. There is a bit of a gap between the seat and the frame as I haven’t bolted anything down, just assembled it together.
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All in all, the 18L tank with part number 58407013200 fits a 2003 640 Enduro perfectly, though it says in the part numbers that it wont. That is maybe because KTM has released a updated version of the tank 58407013400, what are the differences I do not know only that 58407013200 tank isn’t available from KTM any longer.

So that is one thing sorted out, next big thing on the list is a luggage system and a fairing of some sort.

Stay safe!
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I have bolted everything down and it looks like the gap between the frame and seat is there to stay. I guess the really is a special “18L seat” to go with those tanks.
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