Posts Tagged ‘adventure’

Today I have finally fund some time to install a proper chain guide to my 640. Thanks to advrider.com inmates for pointing me in the right direction for the parts I needed for this.

Parts needed:
-54607066100 CHAIN GUIDE REAR ’94
-50207070044 RETAINING PLATE CHAIN GUIDE’94
-1 large M6 washer
-1 M6 nut

Note: On KTM 660 Rally they only use the chain guide without retaining plate

This is what we will be replacing
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With this
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Remove the 2 bolts that hold the old chain guide on the swingarm and be careful, there is a spacer back there.
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That spacer will be replaced by the retaining plate front bolt hole.
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The bad thing about this upgrade is that you have to take the chain apart. So if you are changing your chain, now it is a good time to add a proper chain guide if you wish.
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Once the chain is threaded through the guide, you can start bolting everything back together. Tighten the front bolt just enough so that the whole thing doesn’t fall apart, now align the rear bolt for desired hight.
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Now this is where I have been playing around and swapping parts. Since there is really small gap between the rear bolt and sprocket (5mm or 0,20 inch) I have used a collar nut from the front bolt to save on space, and used a new nut and washer on the front as there is more than enough space. Once both bolts are tightend (don’t forget to use Loctite) the thing is rock solid.
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That is it. You are done. I feel this is a worthy upgrade to anyone that rides more off road.
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Stay safe!

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Like I have mentioned in the Preflight check, I had a busted hard parts air filter cover on my KTM, and I had replaced it with a OEM plastic sealed cover. It worked OK but the bike was getting to much fuel and when you opened the throttle quickly, it got flooded. So instead of getting the carbs re-jetted I have decided to fix the mesh on the filter cover.

Busted cover
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So after getting a suitable mesh, I have been thinking of how should I fix it. I thought about welding, soldering, drilling&screwing,… None of those options as easy to do with my time frame.

So after turning the basement up side down, I found some JB weld and decided to give it a try. New mesh cut to size.
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Adding the JB weld.
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This version of JB weld is supposed to cure for 24h on 20 degrees Celsius or 80min at 80 degrees Celsius. Luckily my mother wasn’t home and I could use her oven.
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After baking it came out well done and smelling like chicken.
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Back on the bike.
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Now time will tell how long this will last.

Stay safe!

From the time I first took my LC4 on a gravel road, I didn’t like the standing position on it. It was to low and to far back for my taste. It felt like I am going to tip over the bars. So I have decide to order a new set of bars. And with new bars, you also need new grips. And everything had to be orange.
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I started working on a nice autumn evening. The disassembly went fast. When I took everything apart, I have decided to grind the locating pins on the controls instead of drilling in to the bars.

Looking at OEM Magura bars and Renthal RC High bars, there is quite a difference in the hight.
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All the cables were luckily long enough, though not lone enough to use a bar pad that came with the bars. Putting everything back together went quite fast.
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And while I was working on the bars, I went ahead and mounted the Barkbuster handguards I had taken from my KLE when I sold it. But with the KTM using fatbars, I had to get a new mounting kit. I got their new BTC-06 kit, I must say that it is a nicely made product, like their guards.

Here is how those look mounted on the bars. They don’t fell as solid as the straight mounts on the 22mm bars, but they clear the cables nicely.
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Here are the guards on the bike.
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A side view of the guards. I have tipped them a bit downwards to clear my wrists in case I fly over the bars. I don’t want to break my wrists.
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Now I only need to wait for good weather to test out the new set up. It felt great on the stand in the garage, but we will see how it turns out in the field.

Stay safe!

A while back, my bike has developed a fault. While kick starting it, e-motor and all the gears were turning with it. It surely didn’t sound healthy.

So I have started investigating the problem. After talking to the guys at advrider.com I have been advised that the sprag clutch is probably stuck in engaged position. So before we head into the process itself, lets look at the tools and parts you will need.

Tools:
– 8, 19(puller screw) and 24 socket
– 32 wrench, at least for my custom magneto puller
– magneto puller, KTM part nr. 584.29.009.000

Parts:
– new gasket, KTM part nr. 584.30.040.000

Here is the puller that they made for me
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So we have started wrenching with the bike on its side. I have put a log under the handlebars. A fret taking 4 bolts (8 socket) out of the case you can simply lift the cover off. But be careful no to tear any of the cables.
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Once the cover is off, this si what you will be looking at.
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To undo the nut you will need a 24 socket. Also it is a right hand thread, so you un-tighten it with turning it right. After that you screw on a puller. At this time I have put the bike up on its side stand as it was easier to undo the nut, fortunately no oil got out.
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After pulling everything off, I have found out that the spring was torn in a few places.
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After cleaning the debris of the spring out of the bike and off the magnet, I have reassembled everything back in reverse. I kicked it a few times and it started up nicely. The only drawback of this is that I now don’t have a e-starter on my bike.

Stay safe!