Archive for the ‘Repair archives’ Category

So the final part of my spring preparation was sprocket and chain swap. From what I have gathered form different forums and people that have been riding the 640’s for year is that the best option for the front sprocket is that OEM KTM ones, and they are also quite cheap. For the rear I have went with JT Sprockets and the OEM KTM didn’t have the one with tooth count that I needed, and the chain I chose was a DID 520VX2, its a 520 spec chain with x-rings.
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So it was time to jack-up the bike and start tearing it apart, yet again.
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With the new sprockets, I have also decided to also change the gearing. I went form 16/42 stock ratio, to a 15/44, recommended by a good friend. After a few rides, I really like this setup and with a throttle cam system, the bike has really, turned in to a crawler at really low revs.
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After removing the old rear sprocket, I have thoroughly cleaned the bolts so that loctite would hold when I put everything back together.
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Shiny new rear sprocket on the hub.
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Before I had reasembeled the rear end, I have takent the adjuster bolts out and dipped them into anti-seize high temp paste so that they wont seize up again.
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Next I installed the front sprocket up, just so that I could measure the chain length needed. I got a 120 link chain so I knew I had to take some links off.
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Shortened up and put together with quick link
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After that it was all just the matter of torquing up the front sprocket and cleaning everything before use.
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All you need to do after a this is go on a short ride to check everything and after that re-adjust the chain tension. This should hopefully last at least 2 seasons of riding.

Stay safe!

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So I am getting close to finishing the bike up. So in this garage session I have tackled the last few bits of work I have left. This afternoon I had some help so there aren’t many pictures. First of all I have changed the clutch master oil. I have used a BelRay 2,5w fork oil in it and it works great.

This is where I left off in part 2
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Next I have oiled a new Twin-air air filter and threw the old one away.
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I got a new battery under warranty installed it and tried the e-start for the first time in I guess 2 years, according to PO when I bought the bike. It turned the engine, which was great to hear.
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That out of the way, I turned my attention to the most ridiculous and complicated oil change process ever invented. I think those Austrian engineers were drunk or had a serious hangover when they designed the oil system on LC4’s. Luckily there are good people on advrider.com that has made things more clear, but still it took a lot of time.

I have use KTM OEM filters and gasket, with BelRay Thumper Racing Syn Ester Blend 4T Engine Oil 15W-50.
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Last oil change on this bike, looking at the date I found on the small inside filter, was 13.6.2014, its good to know that the bike had fresh oil in regular intervals. But I guess PO didn’t have any idea what is with the plugs on the bottom of the engine as the situation there has scared me a bit. Do you see that error?
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He has put the oil drain plug, with the spring in the by-pass valve hole, and the plug for the by-pass valve in to oil drain plug. I have tried correcting the mistake but the threads wouldn’t engage the oil drain plug in it’s rightful hole, so I had to leave it as it was.

Last, but not least, I have changed most of the the bolts that hold the plastics on with new ones.
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Last thing I have to do is change the chain and sprockets on the weekend if I will have any time.

Stay safe!

To continue where I have left off in part 1. I have gone ahead and changed the brake fluid in the rear brakes. Doing brake fluid change is a lot easier if you have a spare set of hands to help on one side since master cylinder is on different side than the caliper.
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This bike will be for solo riding only, no passenger like on KLE, so I have removed the rear foot pegs. I have left the peg hangars in place as they are a good tie down point for luggage.
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Than I have decided to change a spark plug. But trying to get it out with my socket proved impossible. I needed a serious extension to get it undone.
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It was tight and rusted, probably still the OEM one from years back.
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I have seen a few occasions where people have lost their shifter levers. So I have drilled a 1,5 mm hole through the bolt head and safety wire it to the lever itself so it can not get lose and fall off.
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Next on the list was to tidy up the engine bay and get rid of all the non-essential crap in there. I have checked the engine over and saw that previous owner has removed SAS from the bike, which is great, less work for me. But the EPC was still there. You can find info on both system on the links provided.

So this is what you take off the bike. Note that the 90 degree pipe and the little filter have to go back on the bike. The EPC unit and the hoses on the right go to the shelf.
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I have tucked the small filter in behind the rear brake fluid cup. Fits nicely out of the way.
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Before…
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…after. It looks a lot cleaner now, still need to sort out all the disconnected wires and tie them somewhere safe.
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Than I have tackled those really old coolant pipes. I have ordered a set of orange pipes to replace the old black ones.
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I started removing and replacing those hoses one by one. It was quite hard to get some of those hoses off because of all the grime inside on the fittings.
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I have replaced all the hoses but one, which didn’t have a jubilee clip but some soft of permanently clamped metal strap and I didn’t want to mess with it.
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That is it for part 2. Stay tuned for part 3 where I hopefully finish the bike and take it for a spin.

Stay safe!

Spring and warmer temperatures are just around the corner and it is time to sort out the bike for this riding season. I have spent the whole afternoon in the garage today and got a lot done, but I ran out of electricity just before I could finish all my objectives for today.

I have quite a lot to do before I can start ridding. Through this series of posts I will be doing the following things:
-Refresh all fluids
-New filters all round
-New chain and sprockets with 15/44 gearing instead of 16/42
-Swapping clutch and brake levers
-New coolant hoses if they arrive
-New battery
-Sprag clutch replacement
-New throttle tube
-Spark plug

I have probably forgot something but who cares, it’s a long list and I better get to it.
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First on the list was finding out where the clutch is leaking. Or so I thought. I cleaned all the grime on the outside off and expected to find a half empty master cylinder, but when I loosened the bolts It was overfilled, so I guess no leaks. Next on the list was a new clutch lever. I ordered a short lever (54602031000
) because I didn’t want to cut the old ones.
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Looking at the pivot point, 12 years of use have left a mark on it.
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That is the clutch side almost done, still waiting for rubber boot and insert in the master cylinder. But it’s looking good.
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Than I have moved over to the brake side. Same as with the clutch, I got short lever for the front brakes (50313002100).
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Brembo even supplied a HUGE paper instructions
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Old and new lever. You need to swap over the push pin.
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Next I moved to a little something of a improvement, instead of regular maintenance. Since throttle is a little jerky on the 640 I bought a KTM Powerparts Throttle Cam system to try and tame it a little.
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First order of business was removing the grip from the old tube without damage. So I pushed in a screwdriver a little and spray some WD-40 inside. Work it around and deeper in, add WD-40 and repeat. All the way to through the whole grip. and it will slide off without any damage. Make sure you degrease it before reinstalling it on the new throttle tube.
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Now you can slide the rubber boot off the cables and undo the bolts keeping the throttle assembly together. Disconnect the cables and remove the old plastic tube. Once off, be sure to clean the bars thoroughly before moving on.
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Here is the KTM throttle tube with a 200 cam on it that I will try first. You get 3 in the set, stock one a 200 and 400 cams, which have altered cable pull.
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When you put everything together make sure nothing binds and throttle snaps back as it should. There is no need to adjust any cables. Tighten everything back together and replace the rubber boot.
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Next on the list was to replace those rubber inserts in the triple clamps that hold the handlebar clamps on. They were old, damaged and hard.
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Now instead of getting a new set of rubber inserts, I have opted for a solid mounted version and got aluminium inserts. There are some benefits and some drawback to this.
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The swap is a so straight forward that I won’t describe it. Just take a look at the pictures and you should be able to figure it out.
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After securing the bars back to the bike I decided the next thing to take care is the brake fluid. I only managed to do the front as my battery that powers my lights has died, so I will be doing the rear brake in next garage sitting. This was inside the front master cylinder, not to bad.
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Stay tuned for part 2.

Like I have mentioned in the Preflight check, I had a busted hard parts air filter cover on my KTM, and I had replaced it with a OEM plastic sealed cover. It worked OK but the bike was getting to much fuel and when you opened the throttle quickly, it got flooded. So instead of getting the carbs re-jetted I have decided to fix the mesh on the filter cover.

Busted cover
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So after getting a suitable mesh, I have been thinking of how should I fix it. I thought about welding, soldering, drilling&screwing,… None of those options as easy to do with my time frame.

So after turning the basement up side down, I found some JB weld and decided to give it a try. New mesh cut to size.
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Adding the JB weld.
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This version of JB weld is supposed to cure for 24h on 20 degrees Celsius or 80min at 80 degrees Celsius. Luckily my mother wasn’t home and I could use her oven.
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After baking it came out well done and smelling like chicken.
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Back on the bike.
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Now time will tell how long this will last.

Stay safe!

A while back, my bike has developed a fault. While kick starting it, e-motor and all the gears were turning with it. It surely didn’t sound healthy.

So I have started investigating the problem. After talking to the guys at advrider.com I have been advised that the sprag clutch is probably stuck in engaged position. So before we head into the process itself, lets look at the tools and parts you will need.

Tools:
– 8, 19(puller screw) and 24 socket
– 32 wrench, at least for my custom magneto puller
– magneto puller, KTM part nr. 584.29.009.000

Parts:
– new gasket, KTM part nr. 584.30.040.000

Here is the puller that they made for me
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So we have started wrenching with the bike on its side. I have put a log under the handlebars. A fret taking 4 bolts (8 socket) out of the case you can simply lift the cover off. But be careful no to tear any of the cables.
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Once the cover is off, this si what you will be looking at.
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To undo the nut you will need a 24 socket. Also it is a right hand thread, so you un-tighten it with turning it right. After that you screw on a puller. At this time I have put the bike up on its side stand as it was easier to undo the nut, fortunately no oil got out.
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After pulling everything off, I have found out that the spring was torn in a few places.
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After cleaning the debris of the spring out of the bike and off the magnet, I have reassembled everything back in reverse. I kicked it a few times and it started up nicely. The only drawback of this is that I now don’t have a e-starter on my bike.

Stay safe!

Preflight check

Posted: 16/09/2014 in Repair archives

Hey all!

As I have stated in the my bikes post, I have recently bought a KTM LC4 640 Enduro. And like with all second hand motorized things I buy, I always preform a complete check of the bike and do a service on it. So after having a bike for 2 weeks, I have done the following things:

Changed the brake pads, as the ones on the bike were under the service limit, and brake fluid…IMAG0308

…next on the list was the radiator hose that was leaking, and it still leaks after the change, and coolant…IMAG0304

…also the battery needed to be changed…

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…I have found a broken KTM Powerparts filter cover, so I ordered a new one, but instead I got a OEM gasket and plastic cover…

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There are a few more things to do, I still have to clean the air filter, I am thinking of just getting a new one as this one might still be the OEM one installed 12 years ago…

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… and get a new tachometer cover (those things are really expensive), as the buttons are chewed up and water can get inside..IMG_4509

Also I have a new spark plug ready to go in as soon as I get a proper tool to remove the old one.

Stay safe and keep an eye out on the blog as I have quite a few things to post up!