Archive for the ‘Modifications archives’ Category

Today I have finally fund some time to install a proper chain guide to my 640. Thanks to advrider.com inmates for pointing me in the right direction for the parts I needed for this.

Parts needed:
-54607066100 CHAIN GUIDE REAR ’94
-50207070044 RETAINING PLATE CHAIN GUIDE’94
-1 large M6 washer
-1 M6 nut

Note: On KTM 660 Rally they only use the chain guide without retaining plate

This is what we will be replacing
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With this
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Remove the 2 bolts that hold the old chain guide on the swingarm and be careful, there is a spacer back there.
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That spacer will be replaced by the retaining plate front bolt hole.
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The bad thing about this upgrade is that you have to take the chain apart. So if you are changing your chain, now it is a good time to add a proper chain guide if you wish.
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Once the chain is threaded through the guide, you can start bolting everything back together. Tighten the front bolt just enough so that the whole thing doesn’t fall apart, now align the rear bolt for desired hight.
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Now this is where I have been playing around and swapping parts. Since there is really small gap between the rear bolt and sprocket (5mm or 0,20 inch) I have used a collar nut from the front bolt to save on space, and used a new nut and washer on the front as there is more than enough space. Once both bolts are tightend (don’t forget to use Loctite) the thing is rock solid.
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That is it. You are done. I feel this is a worthy upgrade to anyone that rides more off road.
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Stay safe!

For long distance off road riding, you need to be able to take care of yourself, your bike and your electronic equipment (phone, camera,…). And to be able to charge all those hi-tech gizmos on the bike you need some kind of a charging socket. There is a variety of things available on the market today, but I have decided to go with a standard waterproof 12V socket.

Once you decide what to use, it’s time to find a place to mount it on the bike. After looking around the bike for a while and testing/evaluating different positions, I have decided to cut a hole in the dash board.

Here is what I intended to use, a socket and a on/off switch. Unfortunately there was not enough room for both behind the headlight mask.
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Now the nerve wrecking part, cutting a hole in the dash… Luckily everything went great and I nailed it on the first try.
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Just enough room to tighten the nut up.
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Now all I needed to do is to strip the bike down and run the wires.
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Crimped on some connectors, plugged them on, and tidy the wires behind the mask. Make sure you put a fuse on the + side as cloese to the battery as possible.
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Now I have constant power at the socket, like I had on my KLE before. Here are before and after pictures
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Stay safe!

Bagging up

Posted: 05/04/2015 in Modifications archives
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Today I have spent a few hours in the garage looking at where to mount a Kriega US-5 to carry my tool-kit or my medical pack. First I was looking at the rear fender.
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Took a while to disassemble the rear of the bike, only to find out there is no space for the bolts. Looking at the above picture, two most left holes, didn’t have enough space below the fender for washer and a nut. So I reluctantly reassembled the back end together. Checking out the bike with a stuffed bag, I have found a nice spot, on the fairing just above the headlight. On a second thought, that fairing might not be strong enough to support the weight of my tool-kit over rough terrain.

So the only spot on the bike left, was the tank. The stuffed bag looked good on the tank, but I don’t have Kriega tank adapter, so I needed to figure something else out. Bottom strap was not a problem, just threaded it under the seat. Top was a bit more challenging. Straps wouldn’t fit around the frame tube, so I threaded them around radiator shrouds. I was quite happy with the position of the bag, but didn’t like all the straps hanging around. After a few more attempts, I was happy with the result.
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There is enough room at the handlebars not to interfere with steering, or steering lock.
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It sits nicely on the tank. And it won’t get in the way when standing like a standard tank bag.
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That is it for now, field test will be done as soon as the weather improves.

Stay safe!

Today was a nice sunny day here at my place, and instead of riding I have decided its time I tackle the GPS power cable installation. After looking around under the seat, and failing with finding any suitable place, someone has suggested to wire it up to park light.

So I have taken the mask off and had a look inside
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I have stripped the park light wires and tested the polarity. White wire is positive (+) and the brown is negative (-). After that I have found a nice place for for the fuse holder and soldered everything together. Its a bit of a mess behind the headlight on those Enduro models.
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Fuse holder sits nicely above the connectors and tightly wedged untder the dash screws.
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The GPS plug is located at the brake and speed sensor cable guide.
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Here is everything buttoned up, also with new mirrors.
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And the view from the seat is great now, and I won’t get lost any time soon, hopefully.
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Stay safe!

The stock tank on a 640 Enduro only holds 12l, that is enough for around 180km (depending on how you ride). The size of the tank is great if you are riding around in bush or local fire roads and trail, but if you want to do some more adventure riding you need a bit more of a range. For this matter I have decided to get a 18l KTM OEM tank for the 640 Enduro/SM. Those tanks are really rare here in Europe, so I looked over to the great USA for it. They have a lot of good stuff over there for the 640’s., including the tank I need. The prices for those tanks are really cheap, when you convert them to €, but unfortunately shipping and import charges are usually a deal killers.

Scouring the European e-bay system I have found a good tank, and lost the bidding war. By this time I have already been mentally preparing myself to cash out for a brand new tank form KTM. After patiently looking around e-bay for over a month, my luck has changed. There was a tank posted with “Buy-it-now” option. I have quickly contacted the seller about the shipping price and negotiated a bit lower price on the tank. After just 4 days, the DHL showed up with a huge box for me.
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Inside was a well protected tank.
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It has a grey decal already on so it fits my bike perfectly. Also it came with a fuel tap and a few scratches.
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First thing I did was weight the tank, as it felt really heavy when I took it out of the box. It weighs 5,8kg which is just under 13 pounds. Next on the list was filling the tank with water and check for any leaks. Luckily no leaks, after a quick flush I drained the water.
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Now it was time to see if it fits on the bike as the OEM part number said it only fits 2000-2002 KTM 640’s. So I began stripping the bike down.
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Before taking the tank off the bike, I have drained it off fuel. I didn’t want to handle the tank with gas in it like I did on KLE usually.
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To remove the tank you also have to remove the the side covers. Underbelly wasn’t cleaned for a while I guess.
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Naked bike.
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Before putting the big tank on the bike, I took some measurements of both tanks to see how much wider is the 18L one.
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Stock 12L tank with shrouds it’s 43cm or 17 inches wide and the 18L one is 49cm or just over 19 inches wide. That is 3cm or 1,18 inches wider per side. So overall the bike is still very slim, though it looks a lot beefier with this tank on. There is a bit of a gap between the seat and the frame as I haven’t bolted anything down, just assembled it together.
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All in all, the 18L tank with part number 58407013200 fits a 2003 640 Enduro perfectly, though it says in the part numbers that it wont. That is maybe because KTM has released a updated version of the tank 58407013400, what are the differences I do not know only that 58407013200 tank isn’t available from KTM any longer.

So that is one thing sorted out, next big thing on the list is a luggage system and a fairing of some sort.

Stay safe!
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I have bolted everything down and it looks like the gap between the frame and seat is there to stay. I guess the really is a special “18L seat” to go with those tanks.
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When I got the bike, it was gray/black colour scheme. My first thought was I need to make it KTM Orange. So I started with lower fork guards. As the ones on the bike weren’t wrap-around I ordered a 2008 EXC guards made by Polisport.

Here are the stock fork guards on the bike when I got it
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I knew those guards will work with WP43 forks as I have used the same combo on my KLE500 when I made a fork conversion. The only thing you have to do is make the hole for brake line a bit bigger as LC4 has thicker lines than EXC.

Orange vs. black
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And with both Orange guards mounted
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It really is the simplest thing to do if you want to increase the protection of your lower forks. Those guards have already seen some action so look around the blog for more pictures!

Stay safe!

New rubber

Posted: 29/10/2014 in Modifications archives
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Since the bike cam with a used up front Enduro 3 Sahara tyre and a very bad Sava MC23 rear tyre, I have decided I will change those as soon as possible. While I was waiting for the new rubber to arrive, I have also ordered a rim lock for rear wheel.

I have ordered a RFX 2.50 rim lock as it was cheapest and it kinda looked good. To bad Motion-pro lite lock, but they don’t make it in that size.
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I was interested how heavy it was.
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As for the actual tyres, I went with the tried and tested set up of Mitas Cross tyres.

C-17 Dakar front
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And a C-02 rear wheel
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When I put them on, I had around 31.000km on the clock, so we will see hoe long do they last on this tyre shredder. Overall I really like them of road, on road you have to be careful in the corners.

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Stay safe!