Spring and warmer temperatures are just around the corner and it is time to sort out the bike for this riding season. I have spent the whole afternoon in the garage today and got a lot done, but I ran out of electricity just before I could finish all my objectives for today.

I have quite a lot to do before I can start ridding. Through this series of posts I will be doing the following things:
-Refresh all fluids
-New filters all round
-New chain and sprockets with 15/44 gearing instead of 16/42
-Swapping clutch and brake levers
-New coolant hoses if they arrive
-New battery
-Sprag clutch replacement
-New throttle tube
-Spark plug

I have probably forgot something but who cares, it’s a long list and I better get to it.
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First on the list was finding out where the clutch is leaking. Or so I thought. I cleaned all the grime on the outside off and expected to find a half empty master cylinder, but when I loosened the bolts It was overfilled, so I guess no leaks. Next on the list was a new clutch lever. I ordered a short lever (54602031000
) because I didn’t want to cut the old ones.
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Looking at the pivot point, 12 years of use have left a mark on it.
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That is the clutch side almost done, still waiting for rubber boot and insert in the master cylinder. But it’s looking good.
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Than I have moved over to the brake side. Same as with the clutch, I got short lever for the front brakes (50313002100).
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Brembo even supplied a HUGE paper instructions
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Old and new lever. You need to swap over the push pin.
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Next I moved to a little something of a improvement, instead of regular maintenance. Since throttle is a little jerky on the 640 I bought a KTM Powerparts Throttle Cam system to try and tame it a little.
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First order of business was removing the grip from the old tube without damage. So I pushed in a screwdriver a little and spray some WD-40 inside. Work it around and deeper in, add WD-40 and repeat. All the way to through the whole grip. and it will slide off without any damage. Make sure you degrease it before reinstalling it on the new throttle tube.
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Now you can slide the rubber boot off the cables and undo the bolts keeping the throttle assembly together. Disconnect the cables and remove the old plastic tube. Once off, be sure to clean the bars thoroughly before moving on.
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Here is the KTM throttle tube with a 200 cam on it that I will try first. You get 3 in the set, stock one a 200 and 400 cams, which have altered cable pull.
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When you put everything together make sure nothing binds and throttle snaps back as it should. There is no need to adjust any cables. Tighten everything back together and replace the rubber boot.
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Next on the list was to replace those rubber inserts in the triple clamps that hold the handlebar clamps on. They were old, damaged and hard.
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Now instead of getting a new set of rubber inserts, I have opted for a solid mounted version and got aluminium inserts. There are some benefits and some drawback to this.
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The swap is a so straight forward that I won’t describe it. Just take a look at the pictures and you should be able to figure it out.
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After securing the bars back to the bike I decided the next thing to take care is the brake fluid. I only managed to do the front as my battery that powers my lights has died, so I will be doing the rear brake in next garage sitting. This was inside the front master cylinder, not to bad.
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Stay tuned for part 2.

The stock tank on a 640 Enduro only holds 12l, that is enough for around 180km (depending on how you ride). The size of the tank is great if you are riding around in bush or local fire roads and trail, but if you want to do some more adventure riding you need a bit more of a range. For this matter I have decided to get a 18l KTM OEM tank for the 640 Enduro/SM. Those tanks are really rare here in Europe, so I looked over to the great USA for it. They have a lot of good stuff over there for the 640’s., including the tank I need. The prices for those tanks are really cheap, when you convert them to €, but unfortunately shipping and import charges are usually a deal killers.

Scouring the European e-bay system I have found a good tank, and lost the bidding war. By this time I have already been mentally preparing myself to cash out for a brand new tank form KTM. After patiently looking around e-bay for over a month, my luck has changed. There was a tank posted with “Buy-it-now” option. I have quickly contacted the seller about the shipping price and negotiated a bit lower price on the tank. After just 4 days, the DHL showed up with a huge box for me.
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Inside was a well protected tank.
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It has a grey decal already on so it fits my bike perfectly. Also it came with a fuel tap and a few scratches.
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First thing I did was weight the tank, as it felt really heavy when I took it out of the box. It weighs 5,8kg which is just under 13 pounds. Next on the list was filling the tank with water and check for any leaks. Luckily no leaks, after a quick flush I drained the water.
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Now it was time to see if it fits on the bike as the OEM part number said it only fits 2000-2002 KTM 640’s. So I began stripping the bike down.
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Before taking the tank off the bike, I have drained it off fuel. I didn’t want to handle the tank with gas in it like I did on KLE usually.
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To remove the tank you also have to remove the the side covers. Underbelly wasn’t cleaned for a while I guess.
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Naked bike.
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Before putting the big tank on the bike, I took some measurements of both tanks to see how much wider is the 18L one.
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Stock 12L tank with shrouds it’s 43cm or 17 inches wide and the 18L one is 49cm or just over 19 inches wide. That is 3cm or 1,18 inches wider per side. So overall the bike is still very slim, though it looks a lot beefier with this tank on. There is a bit of a gap between the seat and the frame as I haven’t bolted anything down, just assembled it together.
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All in all, the 18L tank with part number 58407013200 fits a 2003 640 Enduro perfectly, though it says in the part numbers that it wont. That is maybe because KTM has released a updated version of the tank 58407013400, what are the differences I do not know only that 58407013200 tank isn’t available from KTM any longer.

So that is one thing sorted out, next big thing on the list is a luggage system and a fairing of some sort.

Stay safe!
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I have bolted everything down and it looks like the gap between the frame and seat is there to stay. I guess the really is a special “18L seat” to go with those tanks.
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This year I have finally decided to go to Verona and visit a Motor Bike Expo 2015. This is one big motorcycle show, you definitely have things to see and lots of stuff to buy. There are a lot of chooper and custom bike stuff and street bikes, but not a lot of off-road stuff. Here are a few pictures of the overland/off road bikes that I took that were the most interesting to me:
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Unfortunately KTM did not have his own booth, it would sure be nice to see some of their bikes up close.

Stay safe!

When I got the bike, it was gray/black colour scheme. My first thought was I need to make it KTM Orange. So I started with lower fork guards. As the ones on the bike weren’t wrap-around I ordered a 2008 EXC guards made by Polisport.

Here are the stock fork guards on the bike when I got it
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I knew those guards will work with WP43 forks as I have used the same combo on my KLE500 when I made a fork conversion. The only thing you have to do is make the hole for brake line a bit bigger as LC4 has thicker lines than EXC.

Orange vs. black
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And with both Orange guards mounted
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It really is the simplest thing to do if you want to increase the protection of your lower forks. Those guards have already seen some action so look around the blog for more pictures!

Stay safe!

2014 in review

Posted: 02/01/2015 in Uncategorized

Hey all!

I would like to thank all of you for visiting my blog and with it motivating me to keep it alive. Have a happy, eventful and safe 2015!

Thanks!

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 25,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 9 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

A little teaser

Posted: 21/11/2014 in Uncategorized

To keep the blog alive, here is a little teaser of what I am currently working on
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Stay safe!

New rubber

Posted: 29/10/2014 in Modifications archives
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Since the bike cam with a used up front Enduro 3 Sahara tyre and a very bad Sava MC23 rear tyre, I have decided I will change those as soon as possible. While I was waiting for the new rubber to arrive, I have also ordered a rim lock for rear wheel.

I have ordered a RFX 2.50 rim lock as it was cheapest and it kinda looked good. To bad Motion-pro lite lock, but they don’t make it in that size.
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I was interested how heavy it was.
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As for the actual tyres, I went with the tried and tested set up of Mitas Cross tyres.

C-17 Dakar front
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And a C-02 rear wheel
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When I put them on, I had around 31.000km on the clock, so we will see hoe long do they last on this tyre shredder. Overall I really like them of road, on road you have to be careful in the corners.

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Stay safe!