For long distance off road riding, you need to be able to take care of yourself, your bike and your electronic equipment (phone, camera,…). And to be able to charge all those hi-tech gizmos on the bike you need some kind of a charging socket. There is a variety of things available on the market today, but I have decided to go with a standard waterproof 12V socket.

Once you decide what to use, it’s time to find a place to mount it on the bike. After looking around the bike for a while and testing/evaluating different positions, I have decided to cut a hole in the dash board.

Here is what I intended to use, a socket and a on/off switch. Unfortunately there was not enough room for both behind the headlight mask.
IMG_4780
IMG_4777

Now the nerve wrecking part, cutting a hole in the dash… Luckily everything went great and I nailed it on the first try.
IMG_4779

Just enough room to tighten the nut up.
IMG_4781

Now all I needed to do is to strip the bike down and run the wires.
IMAG0757
IMAG0758

Crimped on some connectors, plugged them on, and tidy the wires behind the mask. Make sure you put a fuse on the + side as cloese to the battery as possible.
IMAG0761

Now I have constant power at the socket, like I had on my KLE before. Here are before and after pictures
IMG_4776
IMG_4783

Stay safe!

Iced out

Posted: 14/04/2015 in Repair archives

A while back I went riding a bit higher up in my region. I took a faster gravel road this time. I quickly got up to the snow line.
IMAG0688

A little way up the road, I hit quite a fast turn, going from the sun into a shadowy area. Which wasn’t too great of a idea… The turn was solid sheet of ice. And as you can imagine, I went flying in one direction and the bike in the the other. After picking up myself and the bike, a quick inspection showed some problems
IMAG0689

First off, Barkbuster was turned upwards, absorbing the force and saving the bars.
IMAG0690

Shift lever wasn’t so lucky. I guess when the bike rotated and slid backwards it broke.
IMAG0691

And my precious Akrapovic pipe got scratched and dented.
IMAG0701

Luckily I had my tool kit with me, so that I could do some field repairs and limp home. At least I was fixing the bike on a side with a view.
IMAG0692

When I got home, I checked the shifter lever. It was useless, scrap. I wasn’t to keen on cashing out 60€ for a new one, so I had a bit better look at this one and the one I broke last year.
IMAG0693

I got lucky, I have 2 broken shift levers, that were broken on 2 different spots, so I thought I would combine 2 good parts. First I ground and puched out the rivet on both levers.
IMAG0697

I got the good parts together and instead of using a rivet, I used a bolt and a lock-nut.
IMAG0698
IMAG0700

So over-all this crash wasn’t all that expensive, except for bruised ribs and a sore knee.

Stay safe!

Bagging up

Posted: 05/04/2015 in Modifications archives
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Today I have spent a few hours in the garage looking at where to mount a Kriega US-5 to carry my tool-kit or my medical pack. First I was looking at the rear fender.
IMAG0681

Took a while to disassemble the rear of the bike, only to find out there is no space for the bolts. Looking at the above picture, two most left holes, didn’t have enough space below the fender for washer and a nut. So I reluctantly reassembled the back end together. Checking out the bike with a stuffed bag, I have found a nice spot, on the fairing just above the headlight. On a second thought, that fairing might not be strong enough to support the weight of my tool-kit over rough terrain.

So the only spot on the bike left, was the tank. The stuffed bag looked good on the tank, but I don’t have Kriega tank adapter, so I needed to figure something else out. Bottom strap was not a problem, just threaded it under the seat. Top was a bit more challenging. Straps wouldn’t fit around the frame tube, so I threaded them around radiator shrouds. I was quite happy with the position of the bag, but didn’t like all the straps hanging around. After a few more attempts, I was happy with the result.
IMAG0679

There is enough room at the handlebars not to interfere with steering, or steering lock.
IMAG0680

It sits nicely on the tank. And it won’t get in the way when standing like a standard tank bag.
IMAG0678
IMAG0682

That is it for now, field test will be done as soon as the weather improves.

Stay safe!

Today was a nice sunny day here at my place, and instead of riding I have decided its time I tackle the GPS power cable installation. After looking around under the seat, and failing with finding any suitable place, someone has suggested to wire it up to park light.

So I have taken the mask off and had a look inside
IMG_4769

I have stripped the park light wires and tested the polarity. White wire is positive (+) and the brown is negative (-). After that I have found a nice place for for the fuse holder and soldered everything together. Its a bit of a mess behind the headlight on those Enduro models.
IMG_4770

Fuse holder sits nicely above the connectors and tightly wedged untder the dash screws.
IMG_4772

The GPS plug is located at the brake and speed sensor cable guide.
IMG_4773

Here is everything buttoned up, also with new mirrors.
IMG_4774

And the view from the seat is great now, and I won’t get lost any time soon, hopefully.
IMG_4775

Stay safe!

So the final part of my spring preparation was sprocket and chain swap. From what I have gathered form different forums and people that have been riding the 640’s for year is that the best option for the front sprocket is that OEM KTM ones, and they are also quite cheap. For the rear I have went with JT Sprockets and the OEM KTM didn’t have the one with tooth count that I needed, and the chain I chose was a DID 520VX2, its a 520 spec chain with x-rings.
IMG_4657

So it was time to jack-up the bike and start tearing it apart, yet again.
IMAG0635

With the new sprockets, I have also decided to also change the gearing. I went form 16/42 stock ratio, to a 15/44, recommended by a good friend. After a few rides, I really like this setup and with a throttle cam system, the bike has really, turned in to a crawler at really low revs.
IMAG0640
IMAG0637

After removing the old rear sprocket, I have thoroughly cleaned the bolts so that loctite would hold when I put everything back together.
IMAG0633

Shiny new rear sprocket on the hub.
IMAG0638

Before I had reasembeled the rear end, I have takent the adjuster bolts out and dipped them into anti-seize high temp paste so that they wont seize up again.
IMAG0639

Next I installed the front sprocket up, just so that I could measure the chain length needed. I got a 120 link chain so I knew I had to take some links off.
IMAG0642

Shortened up and put together with quick link
IMAG0644
IMAG0649

After that it was all just the matter of torquing up the front sprocket and cleaning everything before use.
IMAG0654

All you need to do after a this is go on a short ride to check everything and after that re-adjust the chain tension. This should hopefully last at least 2 seasons of riding.

Stay safe!

So I am getting close to finishing the bike up. So in this garage session I have tackled the last few bits of work I have left. This afternoon I had some help so there aren’t many pictures. First of all I have changed the clutch master oil. I have used a BelRay 2,5w fork oil in it and it works great.

This is where I left off in part 2
IMG_4754

Next I have oiled a new Twin-air air filter and threw the old one away.
IMG_4746
IMG_4748
IMG_4749

I got a new battery under warranty installed it and tried the e-start for the first time in I guess 2 years, according to PO when I bought the bike. It turned the engine, which was great to hear.
IMG_4751

That out of the way, I turned my attention to the most ridiculous and complicated oil change process ever invented. I think those Austrian engineers were drunk or had a serious hangover when they designed the oil system on LC4’s. Luckily there are good people on advrider.com that has made things more clear, but still it took a lot of time.

I have use KTM OEM filters and gasket, with BelRay Thumper Racing Syn Ester Blend 4T Engine Oil 15W-50.
IMG_4755

Last oil change on this bike, looking at the date I found on the small inside filter, was 13.6.2014, its good to know that the bike had fresh oil in regular intervals. But I guess PO didn’t have any idea what is with the plugs on the bottom of the engine as the situation there has scared me a bit. Do you see that error?
IMG_4756

He has put the oil drain plug, with the spring in the by-pass valve hole, and the plug for the by-pass valve in to oil drain plug. I have tried correcting the mistake but the threads wouldn’t engage the oil drain plug in it’s rightful hole, so I had to leave it as it was.

Last, but not least, I have changed most of the the bolts that hold the plastics on with new ones.
IMG_4757

Last thing I have to do is change the chain and sprockets on the weekend if I will have any time.

Stay safe!

To continue where I have left off in part 1. I have gone ahead and changed the brake fluid in the rear brakes. Doing brake fluid change is a lot easier if you have a spare set of hands to help on one side since master cylinder is on different side than the caliper.
IMG_4699

This bike will be for solo riding only, no passenger like on KLE, so I have removed the rear foot pegs. I have left the peg hangars in place as they are a good tie down point for luggage.
IMG_4701
IMG_4702

Than I have decided to change a spark plug. But trying to get it out with my socket proved impossible. I needed a serious extension to get it undone.
IMG_4722

It was tight and rusted, probably still the OEM one from years back.
IMG_4725

I have seen a few occasions where people have lost their shifter levers. So I have drilled a 1,5 mm hole through the bolt head and safety wire it to the lever itself so it can not get lose and fall off.
IMG_4703

Next on the list was to tidy up the engine bay and get rid of all the non-essential crap in there. I have checked the engine over and saw that previous owner has removed SAS from the bike, which is great, less work for me. But the EPC was still there. You can find info on both system on the links provided.

So this is what you take off the bike. Note that the 90 degree pipe and the little filter have to go back on the bike. The EPC unit and the hoses on the right go to the shelf.
IMG_4719

I have tucked the small filter in behind the rear brake fluid cup. Fits nicely out of the way.
IMG_4721

Before…
IMAG0595

…after. It looks a lot cleaner now, still need to sort out all the disconnected wires and tie them somewhere safe.
IMG_4718

Than I have tackled those really old coolant pipes. I have ordered a set of orange pipes to replace the old black ones.
IMG_4698

I started removing and replacing those hoses one by one. It was quite hard to get some of those hoses off because of all the grime inside on the fittings.
IMG_4729

I have replaced all the hoses but one, which didn’t have a jubilee clip but some soft of permanently clamped metal strap and I didn’t want to mess with it.
IMG_4732
IMG_4743
IMG_4741
IMG_4742

That is it for part 2. Stay tuned for part 3 where I hopefully finish the bike and take it for a spin.

Stay safe!